Make your own free website on Tripod.com

JNU Mountaineering Club

Everest Base Camp / Kala Pathar in Nepal (September 2004)

Home
Links
Programmes
Membership
EC Members
Major Treks
Photo Gallery
Announcements
JNU Sports Office
Frequently Asked Questions
Adventure is an aspect of human life endorsed by the basic instinct of curiosity. It is this sense that has always pushed human beings to explore both the world and themselves. Crossing various boundaries - mental and physical men have always travelled to learn more about far off places and peoples.

Trekking has been one such means of exploration. The JNU Mountaineering Club is known for different sorts of adventure activities that it carries out within and outside campus. The Mt. Everest Base Camp/Kala Pathar trek in the Nepal Himalayas was part of Autumn Trek 2004 and comprised students selected for among other criteria, their physical and mental toughness. Partially funded by JNU, the team of selected students left Delhi on 19 September 2004.

Nepal, once the forbidden land, attracts adventure lovers from all over the globe. A beautiful Himalayan country, Nepal is the home of mountain ranges comprising six thousand to eight thousand metres high peaks of which Mt. Everest at 8852 metres - the highest peak in the world - is the crown. Nepal is therefore and not surprisingly, also rich in flora and fauna, and home to some of the hardiest people and world famous mountaineers and trekkers. The Mt. Everest region known as Sagarmatha in Nepal is the most sought and famous dream destination for trekkers the world over. From Delhi to Kathmandu, through Gorakhpur and Sanouli/Bhairawa is itself a wonderful journey and from Jiri - the last roadhead village before Everest Base Camp - begins a route that was followed also by Tenzing Norgay and Sir Edmund Hillary when they summitted Everest in May 1953.

Twelve days of trekking through wide, picturesque valleys, lush green surroundings, mighty rivers and streams enclosed by numerous, endless and snow-covered peaks resulted in spectacular views of Mount Everest - a great relief for the team excited, anxious and tired due to the strenuous and long days of trekking. A number of passes, inclines, slopes and treacherous routes - passing also several beautiful hamlets and fields - were negotiated to reach this point.

Almost 8,852m, - equal to the height of Mt. Everest - were ascended owing to the fact that the route is full of ascents and descents before the team finally summtited Kala Pathar (5545m). The group proudly hoisted the JNU and JNUMC flags, and clicked pictures. With everlasting memories and following the same route the team returned to Lukla from where the team flew back to Kathmandu in a Russian-made MI-17 helicopter operated by a private airlines. Flying in that part of the world, over the thick blanket of clouds at an altitude of 5000 metres gave the team a different and unique opportunity to see the numerous snow-covered peaks. One could peep through moving clouds into the deep valleys but the Himalayas - the highest and the biggest training ground for the trekkers and mountaineers appeared to be concealing more than it revealed. Two days of sightseeing in Kathmandu followed before the team returned finally to the campus on 13 October.

Whatever has been explored is but the tip of the iceberg. More frontiers remain to be conquered and the JNUMC remains up to the challenge. (Contributor: Rajesh Kapoor)Adventure is an aspect of human life endorsed by the basic instinct of curiosity. It is this sense that has always pushed human beings to explore both the world and themselves. Crossing various boundaries - mental and physical men have always travelled to learn more about far off places and peoples.

Trekking has been one such means of exploration. The JNU Mountaineering Club is known for different sorts of adventure activities that it carries out within and outside campus. The Mt. Everest Base Camp/Kala Pathar trek in the Nepal Himalayas was part of Autumn Trek 2004 and comprised students selected for among other criteria, their physical and mental toughness. Partially funded by JNU, the team of selected students left Delhi on 19 September 2004.

Nepal, once the forbidden land, attracts adventure lovers from all over the globe. A beautiful Himalayan country, Nepal is the home of mountain ranges comprising six thousand to eight thousand metres high peaks of which Mt. Everest at 8852 metres - the highest peak in the world - is the crown. Nepal is therefore and not surprisingly, also rich in flora and fauna, and home to some of the hardiest people and world famous mountaineers and trekkers. The Mt. Everest region known as Sagarmatha in Nepal is the most sought and famous dream destination for trekkers the world over. From Delhi to Kathmandu, through Gorakhpur and Sanouli/Bhairawa is itself a wonderful journey and from Jiri - the last roadhead village before Everest Base Camp - begins a route that was followed also by Tenzing Norgay and Sir Edmund Hillary when they summitted Everest in May 1953.

Twelve days of trekking through wide, picturesque valleys, lush green surroundings, mighty rivers and streams enclosed by numerous, endless and snow-covered peaks resulted in spectacular views of Mount Everest - a great relief for the team excited, anxious and tired due to the strenuous and long days of trekking. A number of passes, inclines, slopes and treacherous routes - passing also several beautiful hamlets and fields - were negotiated to reach this point.

Almost 8,852m, - equal to the height of Mt. Everest - were ascended owing to the fact that the route is full of ascents and descents before the team finally summtited Kala Pathar (5545m). The group proudly hoisted the JNU and JNUMC flags, and clicked pictures. With everlasting memories and following the same route the team returned to Lukla from where the team flew back to Kathmandu in a Russian-made MI-17 helicopter operated by a private airlines. Flying in that part of the world, over the thick blanket of clouds at an altitude of 5000 metres gave the team a different and unique opportunity to see the numerous snow-covered peaks. One could peep through moving clouds into the deep valleys but the Himalayas - the highest and the biggest training ground for the trekkers and mountaineers appeared to be concealing more than it revealed. Two days of sightseeing in Kathmandu followed before the team returned finally to the campus on 13 October.

Whatever has been explored is but the tip of the iceberg. More frontiers remain to be conquered and the JNUMC remains up to the challenge. (Contributor: Rajesh Kapoor)Adventure is an aspect of human life endorsed by the basic instinct of curiosity. It is this sense that has always pushed human beings to explore both the world and themselves. Crossing various boundaries - mental and physical men have always travelled to learn more about far off places and peoples.

Trekking has been one such means of exploration. The JNU Mountaineering Club is known for different sorts of adventure activities that it carries out within and outside campus. The Mt. Everest Base Camp/Kala Pathar trek in the Nepal Himalayas was part of Autumn Trek 2004 and comprised students selected for among other criteria, their physical and mental toughness. Partially funded by JNU, the team of selected students left Delhi on 19 September 2004.

Nepal, once the forbidden land, attracts adventure lovers from all over the globe. A beautiful Himalayan country, Nepal is the home of mountain ranges comprising six thousand to eight thousand metres high peaks of which Mt. Everest at 8852 metres - the highest peak in the world - is the crown. Nepal is therefore and not surprisingly, also rich in flora and fauna, and home to some of the hardiest people and world famous mountaineers and trekkers. The Mt. Everest region known as Sagarmatha in Nepal is the most sought and famous dream destination for trekkers the world over. From Delhi to Kathmandu, through Gorakhpur and Sanouli/Bhairawa is itself a wonderful journey and from Jiri - the last roadhead village before Everest Base Camp - begins a route that was followed also by Tenzing Norgay and Sir Edmund Hillary when they summitted Everest in May 1953.

Twelve days of trekking through wide, picturesque valleys, lush green surroundings, mighty rivers and streams enclosed by numerous, endless and snow-covered peaks resulted in spectacular views of Mount Everest - a great relief for the team excited, anxious and tired due to the strenuous and long days of trekking. A number of passes, inclines, slopes and treacherous routes - passing also several beautiful hamlets and fields - were negotiated to reach this point.

Almost 8,852m, - equal to the height of Mt. Everest - were ascended owing to the fact that the route is full of ascents and descents before the team finally summtited Kala Pathar (5545m). The group proudly hoisted the JNU and JNUMC flags, and clicked pictures. With everlasting memories and following the same route the team returned to Lukla from where the team flew back to Kathmandu in a Russian-made MI-17 helicopter operated by a private airlines. Flying in that part of the world, over the thick blanket of clouds at an altitude of 5000 metres gave the team a different and unique opportunity to see the numerous snow-covered peaks. One could peep through moving clouds into the deep valleys but the Himalayas - the highest and the biggest training ground for the trekkers and mountaineers appeared to be concealing more than it revealed. Two days of sightseeing in Kathmandu followed before the team returned finally to the campus on 13 October.

Whatever has been explored is but the tip of the iceberg. More frontiers remain to be conquered and the JNUMC remains up to the challenge. (Contributor: Rajesh Kapoor)Adventure is an aspect of human life endorsed by the basic instinct of curiosity. It is this sense that has always pushed human beings to explore both the world and themselves. Crossing various boundaries - mental and physical men have always travelled to learn more about far off places and peoples.

Trekking has been one such means of exploration. The JNU Mountaineering Club is known for different sorts of adventure activities that it carries out within and outside campus. The Mt. Everest Base Camp/Kala Pathar trek in the Nepal Himalayas was part of Autumn Trek 2004 and comprised students selected for among other criteria, their physical and mental toughness. Partially funded by JNU, the team of selected students left Delhi on 19 September 2004.

Nepal, once the forbidden land, attracts adventure lovers from all over the globe. A beautiful Himalayan country, Nepal is the home of mountain ranges comprising six thousand to eight thousand metres high peaks of which Mt. Everest at 8852 metres - the highest peak in the world - is the crown. Nepal is therefore and not surprisingly, also rich in flora and fauna, and home to some of the hardiest people and world famous mountaineers and trekkers. The Mt. Everest region known as Sagarmatha in Nepal is the most sought and famous dream destination for trekkers the world over. From Delhi to Kathmandu, through Gorakhpur and Sanouli/Bhairawa is itself a wonderful journey and from Jiri - the last roadhead village before Everest Base Camp - begins a route that was followed also by Tenzing Norgay and Sir Edmund Hillary when they summitted Everest in May 1953.

Twelve days of trekking through wide, picturesque valleys, lush green surroundings, mighty rivers and streams enclosed by numerous, endless and snow-covered peaks resulted in spectacular views of Mount Everest - a great relief for the team excited, anxious and tired due to the strenuous and long days of trekking. A number of passes, inclines, slopes and treacherous routes - passing also several beautiful hamlets and fields - were negotiated to reach this point.

Almost 8,852m, - equal to the height of Mt. Everest - were ascended owing to the fact that the route is full of ascents and descents before the team finally summtited Kala Pathar (5545m). The group proudly hoisted the JNU and JNUMC flags, and clicked pictures. With everlasting memories and following the same route the team returned to Lukla from where the team flew back to Kathmandu in a Russian-made MI-17 helicopter operated by a private airlines. Flying in that part of the world, over the thick blanket of clouds at an altitude of 5000 metres gave the team a different and unique opportunity to see the numerous snow-covered peaks. One could peep through moving clouds into the deep valleys but the Himalayas - the highest and the biggest training ground for the trekkers and mountaineers appeared to be concealing more than it revealed. Two days of sightseeing in Kathmandu followed before the team returned finally to the campus on 13 October.

Whatever has been explored is but the tip of the iceberg. More frontiers remain to be conquered and the JNUMC remains up to the challenge. (Contributor: Rajesh Kapoor)Adventure is an aspect of human life endorsed by the basic instinct of curiosity. It is this sense that has always pushed human beings to explore both the world and themselves. Crossing various boundaries - mental and physical men have always travelled to learn more about far off places and peoples.

Trekking has been one such means of exploration. The JNU Mountaineering Club is known for different sorts of adventure activities that it carries out within and outside campus. The Mt. Everest Base Camp/Kala Pathar trek in the Nepal Himalayas was part of Autumn Trek 2004 and comprised students selected for among other criteria, their physical and mental toughness. Partially funded by JNU, the team of selected students left Delhi on 19 September 2004.

Nepal, once the forbidden land, attracts adventure lovers from all over the globe. A beautiful Himalayan country, Nepal is the home of mountain ranges comprising six thousand to eight thousand metres high peaks of which Mt. Everest at 8852 metres - the highest peak in the world - is the crown. Nepal is therefore and not surprisingly, also rich in flora and fauna, and home to some of the hardiest people and world famous mountaineers and trekkers. The Mt. Everest region known as Sagarmatha in Nepal is the most sought and famous dream destination for trekkers the world over. From Delhi to Kathmandu, through Gorakhpur and Sanouli/Bhairawa is itself a wonderful journey and from Jiri - the last roadhead village before Everest Base Camp - begins a route that was followed also by Tenzing Norgay and Sir Edmund Hillary when they summitted Everest in May 1953.

Twelve days of trekking through wide, picturesque valleys, lush green surroundings, mighty rivers and streams enclosed by numerous, endless and snow-covered peaks resulted in spectacular views of Mount Everest - a great relief for the team excited, anxious and tired due to the strenuous and long days of trekking. A number of passes, inclines, slopes and treacherous routes - passing also several beautiful hamlets and fields - were negotiated to reach this point.

Almost 8,852m, - equal to the height of Mt. Everest - were ascended owing to the fact that the route is full of ascents and descents before the team finally summtited Kala Pathar (5545m). The group proudly hoisted the JNU and JNUMC flags, and clicked pictures. With everlasting memories and following the same route the team returned to Lukla from where the team flew back to Kathmandu in a Russian-made MI-17 helicopter operated by a private airlines. Flying in that part of the world, over the thick blanket of clouds at an altitude of 5000 metres gave the team a different and unique opportunity to see the numerous snow-covered peaks. One could peep through moving clouds into the deep valleys but the Himalayas - the highest and the biggest training ground for the trekkers and mountaineers appeared to be concealing more than it revealed. Two days of sightseeing in Kathmandu followed before the team returned finally to the campus on 13 October.

Whatever has been explored is but the tip of the iceberg. More frontiers remain to be conquered and the JNUMC remains up to the challenge. (Contributor: Rajesh Kapoor)Adventure is an aspect of human life endorsed by the basic instinct of curiosity. It is this sense that has always pushed human beings to explore both the world and themselves. Crossing various boundaries - mental and physical men have always travelled to learn more about far off places and peoples.

Trekking has been one such means of exploration. The JNU Mountaineering Club is known for different sorts of adventure activities that it carries out within and outside campus. The Mt. Everest Base Camp/Kala Pathar trek in the Nepal Himalayas was part of Autumn Trek 2004 and comprised students selected for among other criteria, their physical and mental toughness. Partially funded by JNU, the team of selected students left Delhi on 19 September 2004.

Nepal, once the forbidden land, attracts adventure lovers from all over the globe. A beautiful Himalayan country, Nepal is the home of mountain ranges comprising six thousand to eight thousand metres high peaks of which Mt. Everest at 8852 metres - the highest peak in the world - is the crown. Nepal is therefore and not surprisingly, also rich in flora and fauna, and home to some of the hardiest people and world famous mountaineers and trekkers. The Mt. Everest region known as Sagarmatha in Nepal is the most sought and famous dream destination for trekkers the world over. From Delhi to Kathmandu, through Gorakhpur and Sanouli/Bhairawa is itself a wonderful journey and from Jiri - the last roadhead village before Everest Base Camp - begins a route that was followed also by Tenzing Norgay and Sir Edmund Hillary when they summitted Everest in May 1953.

Twelve days of trekking through wide, picturesque valleys, lush green surroundings, mighty rivers and streams enclosed by numerous, endless and snow-covered peaks resulted in spectacular views of Mount Everest - a great relief for the team excited, anxious and tired due to the strenuous and long days of trekking. A number of passes, inclines, slopes and treacherous routes - passing also several beautiful hamlets and fields - were negotiated to reach this point.

Almost 8,852m, - equal to the height of Mt. Everest - were ascended owing to the fact that the route is full of ascents and descents before the team finally summtited Kala Pathar (5545m). The group proudly hoisted the JNU and JNUMC flags, and clicked pictures. With everlasting memories and following the same route the team returned to Lukla from where the team flew back to Kathmandu in a Russian-made MI-17 helicopter operated by a private airlines. Flying in that part of the world, over the thick blanket of clouds at an altitude of 5000 metres gave the team a different and unique opportunity to see the numerous snow-covered peaks. One could peep through moving clouds into the deep valleys but the Himalayas - the highest and the biggest training ground for the trekkers and mountaineers appeared to be concealing more than it revealed. Two days of sightseeing in Kathmandu followed before the team returned finally to the campus on 13 October.

Whatever has been explored is but the tip of the iceberg. More frontiers remain to be conquered and the JNUMC remains up to the challenge. (Contributor: Rajesh Kapoor)Adventure is an aspect of human life endorsed by the basic instinct of curiosity. It is this sense that has always pushed human beings to explore both the world and themselves. Crossing various boundaries - mental and physical men have always travelled to learn more about far off places and peoples.

Trekking has been one such means of exploration. The JNU Mountaineering Club is known for different sorts of adventure activities that it carries out within and outside campus. The Mt. Everest Base Camp/Kala Pathar trek in the Nepal Himalayas was part of Autumn Trek 2004 and comprised students selected for among other criteria, their physical and mental toughness. Partially funded by JNU, the team of selected students left Delhi on 19 September 2004.

Nepal, once the forbidden land, attracts adventure lovers from all over the globe. A beautiful Himalayan country, Nepal is the home of mountain ranges comprising six thousand to eight thousand metres high peaks of which Mt. Everest at 8852 metres - the highest peak in the world - is the crown. Nepal is therefore and not surprisingly, also rich in flora and fauna, and home to some of the hardiest people and world famous mountaineers and trekkers. The Mt. Everest region known as Sagarmatha in Nepal is the most sought and famous dream destination for trekkers the world over. From Delhi to Kathmandu, through Gorakhpur and Sanouli/Bhairawa is itself a wonderful journey and from Jiri - the last roadhead village before Everest Base Camp - begins a route that was followed also by Tenzing Norgay and Sir Edmund Hillary when they summitted Everest in May 1953.

Twelve days of trekking through wide, picturesque valleys, lush green surroundings, mighty rivers and streams enclosed by numerous, endless and snow-covered peaks resulted in spectacular views of Mount Everest - a great relief for the team excited, anxious and tired due to the strenuous and long days of trekking. A number of passes, inclines, slopes and treacherous routes - passing also several beautiful hamlets and fields - were negotiated to reach this point.

Almost 8,852m, - equal to the height of Mt. Everest - were ascended owing to the fact that the route is full of ascents and descents before the team finally summtited Kala Pathar (5545m). The group proudly hoisted the JNU and JNUMC flags, and clicked pictures. With everlasting memories and following the same route the team returned to Lukla from where the team flew back to Kathmandu in a Russian-made MI-17 helicopter operated by a private airlines. Flying in that part of the world, over the thick blanket of clouds at an altitude of 5000 metres gave the team a different and unique opportunity to see the numerous snow-covered peaks. One could peep through moving clouds into the deep valleys but the Himalayas - the highest and the biggest training ground for the trekkers and mountaineers appeared to be concealing more than it revealed. Two days of sightseeing in Kathmandu followed before the team returned finally to the campus on 13 October.

Whatever has been explored is but the tip of the iceberg. More frontiers remain to be conquered and the JNUMC remains up to the challenge. (Contributor: Rajesh Kapoor)Adventure is an aspect of human life endorsed by the basic instinct of curiosity. It is this sense that has always pushed human beings to explore both the world and themselves. Crossing various boundaries - mental and physical men have always travelled to learn more about far off places and peoples.

Trekking has been one such means of exploration. The JNU Mountaineering Club is known for different sorts of adventure activities that it carries out within and outside campus. The Mt. Everest Base Camp/Kala Pathar trek in the Nepal Himalayas was part of Autumn Trek 2004 and comprised students selected for among other criteria, their physical and mental toughness. Partially funded by JNU, the team of selected students left Delhi on 19 September 2004.

Nepal, once the forbidden land, attracts adventure lovers from all over the globe. A beautiful Himalayan country, Nepal is the home of mountain ranges comprising six thousand to eight thousand metres high peaks of which Mt. Everest at 8852 metres - the highest peak in the world - is the crown. Nepal is therefore and not surprisingly, also rich in flora and fauna, and home to some of the hardiest people and world famous mountaineers and trekkers. The Mt. Everest region known as Sagarmatha in Nepal is the most sought and famous dream destination for trekkers the world over. From Delhi to Kathmandu, through Gorakhpur and Sanouli/Bhairawa is itself a wonderful journey and from Jiri - the last roadhead village before Everest Base Camp - begins a route that was followed also by Tenzing Norgay and Sir Edmund Hillary when they summitted Everest in May 1953.

Twelve days of trekking through wide, picturesque valleys, lush green surroundings, mighty rivers and streams enclosed by numerous, endless and snow-covered peaks resulted in spectacular views of Mount Everest - a great relief for the team excited, anxious and tired due to the strenuous and long days of trekking. A number of passes, inclines, slopes and treacherous routes - passing also several beautiful hamlets and fields - were negotiated to reach this point.

Almost 8,852m, - equal to the height of Mt. Everest - were ascended owing to the fact that the route is full of ascents and descents before the team finally summtited Kala Pathar (5545m). The group proudly hoisted the JNU and JNUMC flags, and clicked pictures. With everlasting memories and following the same route the team returned to Lukla from where the team flew back to Kathmandu in a Russian-made MI-17 helicopter operated by a private airlines. Flying in that part of the world, over the thick blanket of clouds at an altitude of 5000 metres gave the team a different and unique opportunity to see the numerous snow-covered peaks. One could peep through moving clouds into the deep valleys but the Himalayas - the highest and the biggest training ground for the trekkers and mountaineers appeared to be concealing more than it revealed. Two days of sightseeing in Kathmandu followed before the team returned finally to the campus on 13 October.

Whatever has been explored is but the tip of the iceberg. More frontiers remain to be conquered and the JNUMC remains up to the challenge. (Contributor: Rajesh Kapoor)

Contact Us :



Sports Office

Jawaharlal Nehru University

New Delhi-110067

Tel: 011-26704764